Thursday, March 21, 2013

AESOP - SHORT STORIES







Aesop was a Greek fabulist credited with a collection of stories known as Aesop's Fables. The fables usually feature an important "life lesson" that is usually wrapped up in a clever final pronouncement.





Though Aesop's own story is a result of myth and legend, it is widely believed that he was a slave from Phrygia, around 600 BC. Aesop lived at the court of King Croesus, after having served many masters as a slave. He shared his wisdom and smart wit by telling humorous tales, while serving on several missions at the pleasure of the King.



An illustration for the story The Ant And The Dove by the author Aesop



THE ANT AND THE DOVE



A Dove saw an Ant fall into a brook. The Ant struggled in vain to reach the bank, and in pity, the Dove dropped a blade of straw close beside it. Clinging to the straw like a shipwrecked sailor to a broken spar, the Ant floated safely to shore.


Soon after, the Ant saw a man getting ready to kill the Dove with a stone. But just as he cast the stone, the Ant stung him in the heel, so that the pain made him miss his aim, and the startled Dove flew to safety in a distant wood.


A kindness is never wasted.



An illustration for the story A Raven And A Swan by the author Aesop


A RAVEN AND A SWAN


A Raven, which you know is black as coal, was envious of the Swan, because her feathers were as white as the purest snow. The foolish bird got the idea that if he lived like the Swan, swimming and diving all day long and eating the weeds and plants that grow in the water, his feathers would turn white like the Swan's.


So he left his home in the woods and fields and flew down to live on the lakes and in the marshes. But though he washed and washed all day long, almost drowning himself at it, his feathers remained as black as ever. And as the water weeds he ate did not agree with him, he got thinner and thinner, and at last he died.


A change of habits will not alter nature.




An illustration for the story The Astrologer by the author Aesop





THE ASTROLOGER



A man who lived a long time ago believed that he could read the future in the stars. He called himself an Astrologer, and spent his time at night gazing at the sky.


One evening he was walking along the open road outside the village. His eyes were fixed on the stars. He thought he saw there that the end of the world was at hand, when all at once, down he went into a hole full of mud and water.


There he stood up to his ears, in the muddy water, and madly clawing at the slippery sides of the hole in his effort to climb out.


His cries for help soon brought the villagers running. As they pulled him out of the mud, one of them said:


"You pretend to read the future in the stars, and yet you fail to see what is at your feet! This may teach you to pay more attention to what is right in front of you, and let the future take care of itself."


"What use is it," said another, "to read the stars, when you can't see what's right here on the earth ?"


Take care of the little things and the big things will take care of themselves.




An illustration for the story The Cock And The Fox by the author Aesop



THE  COCK  AND  THE  FOX


One bright evening as the sun was sinking on a glorious world a wise old Cock flew into a tree to roost. Before he composed himself to rest, he flapped his wings three times and crowed loudly. But just as he was about to put his head under his wing, his beady eyes caught a flash of red and a glimpse of a long pointed nose, and there just below him stood Master Fox.


"Have you heard the wonderful news ?" cried the Fox in a very joyful and excited manner.


"What news ?" asked the Cock very calmly . But he had a queer, fluttery feeling inside him, for, you know, he was very much afraid of the Fox.


"Your family and mine and all other animals have agreed to forget their differences and live in peace and friendship from now on forever. Just think of it ! I simply cannot wait to embrace you ! Do come down, dear friend, and let us celebrate the joyful event."


"How grand !" said the Cock. "I certainly am delighted at the news." But he spoke in an absent way, and stretching up on tiptoes, seemed to be looking at something afar off.


"What is it you see ?" asked the Fox a little anxiously.


"Why, it looks to me like a couple of Dogs coming this way. They must have heard the good news and—"


But the Fox did not wait to hear more. Off he started on a run.


"Wait," cried the Cock. "Why do you run ? The Dogs are friends of yours now ! "


"Yes," answered the Fox. "But they might not have heard the news. Besides, I have a very important errand that I had almost forgotten about."


The Cock smiled as he buried his head in his feathers and went to sleep, for he had succeeded in outwitting a very crafty enemy.


The trickster is easily tricked.



An illustration for the story The Fox And The Grapes by the author Aesop



THE  FOX  AND  THE GRAPES


A Fox one day spied a beautiful bunch of ripe grapes hanging from a vine trained along the branches of a tree. The grapes seemed ready to burst with juice, and the Fox's mouth watered as he gazed longingly at them.


The bunch hung from a high branch, and the Fox had to jump for it. The first time he jumped he missed it by a long way. So he walked off a short distance and took a running leap at it, only to fall short once more. Again and again he tried, but in vain.


Now he sat down and looked at the grapes in disgust.


"What a fool I am," he said. "Here I am wearing myself out to get a bunch of sour grapes that are not worth gaping for."


And off he walked very, very scornfully.


There are many who pretend to despise and belittle that which is beyond their reach.




An illustration for the story The Fox And The Stork by the author Aesop


THE FOX AND THE STORK





The Fox one day thought of a plan to amuse himself at the expense of the Stork, at whose odd appearance he was always laughing.


"You must come and dine with me today," he said to the Stork, smiling to himself at the trick he was going to play. The Stork gladly accepted the invitation and arrived in good time and with a very good appetite.


For dinner the Fox served soup. But it was set out in a very shallow dish, and all the Stork could do was to wet the very tip of his bill. Not a drop of soup could he get. But the Fox lapped it up easily, and, to increase the disappointment of the Stork, made a great show of enjoyment.


The hungry Stork was much displeased at the trick, but he was a calm, even-tempered fellow and saw no good in flying into a rage. Instead, not long afterward, he invited the Fox to dine with him in turn. The Fox arrived promptly at the time that had been set, and the Stork served a fish dinner that had a very appetizing smell. But it was served in a tall jar with a very narrow neck. The Stork could easily get at the food with his long bill, but all the Fox could do was to lick the outside of the jar, and sniff at the delicious odor. And when the Fox lost his temper, the Stork said calmly:


Do not play tricks on your neighbors unless you can stand the same treatment yourself.



An illustration for the story The Lion The Ass And The Fox by the author Aesop


THE LIONi THE ASS AND THE FOX


A Lion, an Ass, and a Fox were hunting in company, and caught a large quantity of game. The Ass was asked to divide the spoil. This he did very fairly, giving each an equal share.


The Fox was well satisfied, but the Lion flew into a great rage over it, and with one stroke of his huge paw, he added the Ass to the pile of slain.


Then he turned to the Fox.


"You divide it," he roared angrily.


The Fox wasted no time in talking. He quickly piled all the game into one great heap. From this he took a very small portion for himself, such undesirable bits as the horns and hoofs of a mountain goat, and the end of an ox tail.


The Lion now recovered his good humor entirely.


"Who taught you to divide so fairly?" he asked pleasantly.


"I learned a lesson from the Ass," replied the Fox, carefully edging away.


Learn from the misfortunes of others.



An illustration for the story The Ass In The Lions Skin by the author Aesop


THE ASS IN THE LIONS SKIN

An Ass found a Lion's skin left in the forest by a hunter. He dressed himself in it, and amused himself by hiding in a thicket and rushing out suddenly at the animals who passed that way. All took to their heels the moment they saw him.


The Ass was so pleased to see the animals running away from him, just as if he were King Lion himself, that he could not keep from expressing his delight by a loud, harsh bray. A Fox, who ran with the rest, stopped short as soon as he heard the voice. Approaching the Ass, he said with a laugh:


"If you had kept your mouth shut you might have frightened me, too. But you gave yourself away with that silly bray."


A fool may deceive by his dress and appearance, but his words will soon show what he really is.

 

An illustration for the story Two Travelers And A Bear by the author Aesop



TWO TRAVELERS AND A BEAR


Two Men were traveling in company through a forest, when, all at once, a huge Bear crashed out of the brush near them.


One of the Men, thinking of his own safety, climbed a tree.


The other, unable to fight the savage beast alone, threw himself on the ground and lay still, as if he were dead. He had heard that a Bear will not touch a dead body.


It must have been true, for the Bear snuffed at the Man's head awhile, and then, seeming to be satisfied that he was dead, walked away.


The Man in the tree climbed down.


"It looked just as if that Bear whispered in your ear," he said. "What did he tell you ?"



"He said," answered the other, "that it was not at all wise to keep company with a fellow who would desert his friend in a moment of danger."


Misfortune is the test of true friendship.



An illustration for the story The Wolf In Sheeps Clothing by the author Aesop



THE WOLF IN SHEEPS CLOTHING


A certain Wolf could not get enough to eat because of the watchfulness of the Shepherds. But one night he found a sheep skin that had been cast aside and forgotten. The next day, dressed in the skin, the Wolf strolled into the pasture with the Sheep. Soon a little Lamb was following him about and was quickly led away to slaughter.


That evening the Wolf entered the fold with the flock. But it happened that the Shepherd took a fancy for mutton broth that very evening, and, picking up a knife, went to the fold. There the first he laid hands on and killed was the Wolf.


The evil doer often comes to harm through his own deceit.



An illustration for the story The Owl And The Grasshopper by the author Aesop

THE OWL AND THE GRASSHOPPER


The Owl always takes her sleep during the day. Then after sundown, when the rosy light fades from the sky and the shadows rise slowly through the wood, out she comes ruffling and blinking from the old hollow tree. Now her weird "hoo-hoo-hoo-oo-oo" echoes through the quiet wood, and she begins her hunt for the bugs and beetles, frogs and mice she likes so well to eat.


Now there was a certain old Owl who had become very cross and hard to please as she grew older, especially if anything disturbed her daily slumbers. One warm summer afternoon as she dozed away in her den in the old oak tree, a Grasshopper nearby began a joyous but very raspy song. Out popped the old Owl's head from the opening in the tree that served her both for door and for window.


"Get away from here, sir," she said to the Grasshopper. "Have you no manners? You should at least respect my age and leave me to sleep in quiet!"


But the Grasshopper answered saucily that he had as much right to his place in the sun as the Owl had to her place in the old oak. Then he struck up a louder and still more rasping tune.


The wise old Owl knew quite well that it would do no good to argue with the Grasshopper, nor with anybody else for that matter. Besides, her eyes were not sharp enough by day to permit her to punish the Grasshopper as he deserved. So she laid aside all hard words and spoke very kindly to him.


"Well sir," she said, "if I must stay awake, I am going to settle right down to enjoy your singing. Now that I think of it, I have a wonderful wine here, sent me from Olympus, of which I am told Apollo drinks before he sings to the high gods. Please come up and taste this delicious drink with me. I know it will make you sing like Apollo himself."


The foolish Grasshopper was taken in by the Owl's flattering words. Up he jumped to the Owl's den, but as soon as he was near enough so the old Owl could see him clearly, she pounced upon him and ate him up.


Flattery is not a proof of true admiration.


Do not let flattery throw you off your guard against an enemy.


An illustration for the story The Peacock And The Crane by the author Aesop



THE PEACOCK AND THE CRANE


A Peacock, puffed up with vanity, met a Crane one day, and to impress him spread his gorgeous tail in the Sun.


"Look," he said. "What have you to compare with this ? I am dressed in all the glory of the rainbow, while your feathers are gray as dust!"


The Crane spread his broad wings and flew up toward the sun.


"Follow me if you can," he said. But the Peacock stood where he was among the birds of the barnyard, while the Crane soared in freedom far up into the blue sky.


The useful is of much more importance and value, than the ornamental.




An illustration for the story The Miser by the author Aesop


THE MISER



A Miser had buried his gold in a secret place in his garden. Every day he went to the spot, dug up the treasure and counted it piece by piece to make sure it was all there. He made so many trips that a Thief, who had been observing him, guessed what it was the Miser had hidden, and one night quietly dug up the treasure and made off with it.


When the Miser discovered his loss, he was overcome with grief and despair. He groaned and cried and tore his hair.


A passerby heard his cries and asked what had happened.


"My gold ! O my gold !" cried the Miser, wildly, "someone has robbed me !"


"Your gold! There in that hole? Why did you put it there? Why did you not keep it in the house where you could easily get it when you had to buy things ?"


"Buy!" screamed the Miser angrily. "Why, I never touched the gold. I couldn't think of spending any of it."


The stranger picked up a large stone and threw it into the hole.


"If that is the case," he said, "cover up that stone. It is worth just as much to you as the treasure you lost !"


A possession is worth no more than the use we make of it.


An illustration for the story The Mother And The Wolf by the author Aesop




THE MOTHER AND THE WOLF


Early one morning a hungry Wolf was prowling around a cottage at the edge of a village, when he heard a child crying in the house. Then he heard the Mother's voice say:


"Hush, child, hush! Stop your crying, or I will give you to the Wolf !"


Surprised but delighted at the prospect of so delicious a meal, the Wolf settled down under an open window, expecting every moment to have the child handed out to him. But though the little one continued to fret, the Wolf waited all day in vain. Then, toward nightfall, he heard the Mother's voice again as she sat down near the window to sing and rock her baby to sleep.


"There, child, there! The Wolf shall not get you. No, no ! Daddy is watching and Daddy will kill him if he should come near !"


Just then the Father came within sight of the home, and the Wolf was barely able to save himself from the Dogs by a clever bit of running.


Do not believe everything you hear.





An illustration for the story The Hares And The Frogs by the author Aesop

THE HARES AND THE FROGS


Hares, as you know, are very timid. The least shadow, sends them scurrying in fright to a hiding place. Once they decided to die rather than live in such misery. But while they were debating how best to meet death, they thought they heard a noise and in a flash were scampering off to the warren. On the way they passed a pond where a family of Frogs was sitting among the reeds on the bank. In an instant the startled Frogs were seeking safety in the mud.


"Look," cried a Hare, "things are not so bad after all, for here are creatures who are even afraid of us !"


However unfortunate we may think we are there is always someone worse off than ourselves.



An illustration for the story The Kid And The Wolf by the author Aesop


THE KID AND THE WOLF


A frisky young Kid had been left by the herdsman on the thatched roof of a sheep shelter to keep him out of harm's way. The Kid was browsing near the edge of the roof, when he spied a Wolf and began to jeer at him, making faces and abusing him to his heart's content.


"I hear you," said the Wolf, "and I haven't the least grudge against you for what you say or do. When you are up there it is the roof that's talking, not you."


Do not say anything at any time that you would not say at all times.




An illustration for the story The Man And The Satyr by the author Aesop

THE MAN AND THE SATYR



A long time ago a Man met a Satyr in the forest and succeeded in making friends with him. The two soon became the best of comrades, living together in the Man's hut. But one cold winter evening, as they were walking homeward, the Satyr saw the Man blow on his fingers.


"Why do you do that ?" asked the Satyr.


"To warm my hands," the Man replied.


When they reached home the Man prepared two bowls of porridge. These he placed steaming hot on the table, and the comrades sat down very cheerfully to enjoy the meal. But much to the Satyr's surprise, the Man began to blow into his bowl of porridge.


"Why do you do that ?" he asked.


"To cool my porridge," replied the Man.


The Satyr sprang hurriedly to his feet and made for the door.


"Goodby," he said, "I've seen enough. A fellow that blows hot and cold in the same breath cannot be friends with me !"


The man who talks for both sides is not to be trusted by either.


An illustration for the story The Dogs And The Hides by the author Aesop




THE DOGS AND THE HIDES



Some hungry Dogs saw a number of hides at the bottom of a stream where the Tanner had put them to soak. A fine hide makes an excellent meal for a hungry Dog, but the water was deep and the Dogs could not reach the hides from the bank. So they held a council and decided that the very best thing to do was to drink up the river.


All fell to lapping up the water as fast as they could. But though they drank and drank until, one after another, all of them had burst with drinking, still, for all their effort, the water in the river remained as high as ever.


Do not try to do impossible things.




An illustration for the story The Cat And The Old Rat by the author Aesop


THE CAT AND THE OLD RAT


There was once a Cat who was so watchful, that a Mouse hardly dared show the tip of his whiskers for fear of being eaten alive. That Cat seemed to be everywhere at once with his claws all ready for a pounce. At last the Mice kept so closely to their dens, that the Cat saw he would have to use his wits well to catch one. So one day he climbed up on a shelf and hung from it, head downward, as if he were dead, holding himself up by clinging to some ropes with one paw.


When the Mice peeped out and saw him in that position, they thought he had been hung up there in punishment for some misdeed. Very timidly at first they stuck out their heads and sniffed about carefully. But as nothing stirred, all trooped joyfully out to celebrate the death of the Cat.


Just then the Cat let go his hold, and before the Mice recovered from their surprise, he had made an end of three or four.


Now the Mice kept more strictly at home than ever. But the Cat, who was still hungry for Mice, knew more tricks than one. Rolling himself in flour until he was covered completely, he lay down in the flour bin, with one eye open for the Mice.


Sure enough, the Mice soon began to come out. To the Cat it was almost as if he already had a plump young Mouse under his claws, when an old Rat, who had had much experience with Cats and traps, and had even lost a part of his tail to pay for it, sat up at a safe distance from a hole in the wall where he lived.


"Take care!" he cried. "That may be a heap of meal, but it looks to me very much like the Cat. Whatever it is, it is wisest to keep at a safe distance."


The wise do not let themselves be tricked a second time.




An illustration for the story The Cat The Cock And The Young Mouse by the author Aesop



THE CAT THE COCK AND THE YOUNG MOUSE


A very young Mouse, who had never seen anything of the world, almost came to grief the very first time he ventured out. And this is the story he told his mother about his adventures.


"I was strolling along very peaceably when, just as I turned the corner into the next yard, I saw two strange creatures. One of them had a very kind and gracious look, but the other was the most fearful monster you can imagine. You should have seen him.


"On top of his head and in front of his neck hung pieces of raw red meat. He walked about restlessly, tearing up the ground with his toes, and beating his arms savagely against his sides. The moment he caught sight of me he opened his pointed mouth as if to swallow me, and then he let out a piercing roar that frightened me almost to death."


Can you guess who it was that our young Mouse was trying to describe to his mother ? It was nobody but the Barnyard Cock and the first one the little Mouse had ever seen.


"If it had not been for that terrible monster," the Mouse went on, "I should have made the acquaintance of the pretty creature, who looked so good and gentle. He had thick, velvety fur, a meek face, and a look that was very modest, though his eyes were bright and shining. As he looked at me he waved his fine long tail and smiled.


"I am sure he was just about to speak to me when the monster I have told you about let out a screaming yell, and I ran for my life."


"My son," said the Mother Mouse, "that gentle creature you saw was none other than the Cat. Under his kindly appearance, he bears a grudge against every one of us. The other was nothing but a bird who wouldn't harm you in the least. As for the Cat, he eats us. So be thankful, my child, that you escaped with your life, and, as long as you live, never judge people by their looks."


Do not trust alone to outward appearances.







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